Orange Pippin

This has been adopted and lovingly cared for by Melanie Frankell, a regular volunteer in our community orchard. It was bought for her by Christine & Derek Hosking.

Cox’s Orange Pippin, in Britain often referred to simply as Cox, is an apple cultivar first grown in 1830, at Colnbrook in Buckinghamshire, England, by the retired brewer and horticulturist Richard Cox.
‘Cox’s Orange Pippin’ is highly regarded due to its excellent flavour and attractive appearance. The apples are of medium size, orange-red in colour, deepening to bright red and mottled with carmine over a deep yellow background. The flesh is very aromatic, yellow-white, fine-grained, crisp, and very juicy. Cox’s flavour is sprightly subacid, with hints of cherry and anise, becoming softer and milder with age. When ripe apples are shaken, the seeds make a rattling sound as they are only loosely held in the apple’s flesh.

One of the best in quality of the English dessert apples, Cox’s Orange Pippin may be eaten out of hand or sliced. Not recommended for cooking, it cooks to a fine froth. Cox’s Orange Pippin is often blended with other varieties in the production of cider.

Origins

  • Species: Malus domestica
  • Parentage: Ribston Pippin ?
  • Originates from: England, United Kingdom
  • Introduced: 1825
  • Orange Pippin Cultivar ID: 1086
  • UK National Fruit Collection accession: 2000-008

Identification

  • Fruit colour: Red / Orange flush
  • Flesh colour: Yellow to Very Yellow
  • Flesh colour: White to Cream, pale yellow
  • Fruit size: Small
  • Fruit size: Medium
  • Fruit size: Large
  • Fruit shape: Round
  • Fruit shape: Round-conical
  • Fruit shape: Conical
  • Fruit shape: Oblong-conical
  • Fruit shape: Oblong
  • Shape features (vertical view): Oblique – slanted
  • Shape features (vertical view): Symmetrical
  • Shape uniformity: Uniform, in size and shape
  • Bultitude apple group: 7. Flushed / striped, some russeting, sweet
  • Russet % coverage: High
  • Russet % coverage: Medium
  • Russet % coverage: Low
  • Basin russet: Gray to Brown Russet
  • Basin russet: Little, light russet
  • Basin russet: Smooth, fine Russet

Using

  • Uses: Eat fresh
  • Uses: Cooking
  • Uses: Juice
  • Uses: Hard cider
  • Uses: Drying
  • Flavour quality: Very good
  • Flavour quality: Exceptional
  • Flavour style: Sweet/Sharp
  • Flavour style: Aromatic
  • Flavour style: Honeyed / Scented
  • Flavour style: Sharp / refreshing
  • Harvest period: Mid-Late season
  • Use / keeping: 1-2 months
  • Vitamin C content: Medium

Growing

  • Cropping: Light
  • Flowering period: Mid season
  • Flowering group: 3
  • Fertility: Self-sterile Some forms are self-fertile
  • Ploidy: Diploid
  • Vigour: Average growth
  • Gardening skill: Some skill needed
  • Fruit bearing: Spur-bearer
  • General disease resistance: Poor
  • Period of origin: 1800 – 1849

Climate

  • Climate suitability: Warm climates
  • Climate suitability: Temperate climates
  • Blossom frost-resistance: Susceptible

Other qualities

  • Awards: RHS AGM

Diseases

  • Canker  – Very susceptible
  • Scab  – Very susceptible
  • Mildew  – Some susceptibility
  • Fireblight  – Some susceptibility
  • Cedar apple rust  – Some susceptibility

Relationships to other varieties

Parents and other ancestors of this variety:

  • Ribston Pippin – Ribston Pippin is generally believed to be one of the parents of Cox